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Family Plot

Barbara Harris as Blanche Tyler, the psychic, in Alfred Hitchcock's last film, Family Plot.

Family Plot was produced in 1975 and released in 1976

Cast

Barbara Harris... Blanche Tyler
Bruce Dern... George Lumley
William Devane... Arthur Adamson aka Edward Shoebridge
Karen Black... Fran
Ed Lauter... Joseph P. Maloney
Cathleen Nesbitt... Julia Rainbird
Katherine Helmond... Mrs. Maloney
Warren J. Kemmerling... Grandison
Edith Atwater... Mrs. Clay
William Prince... Bishop Wood
Nicholas Colasanto... Constantine
Marge Redmond... Vera Hannagan
John Lehne... Andy Bush
Charles Tyner... Wheeler - Stone Cutter
Alexander Lockwood... Parson at Funeral
Martin West... Floyd Sanger

Family Plot(1976) titles

 Hitchcock Titles Frenzy

 

 

Black people in Hitchcock's Films

Downhill

In Marseille there is a black man among the sailors who says that Roddy (Ivor Novello) is "dotty – he’s seein’ things."

The Ring

At the fair people can throw balls on a black man to make him fall down. Two boys throw an egg at him, to the crowd's amusement.

One of the members of "One-Round" Jack's team is black.

Champagne

The black servant brings a telegram to the father (Gordon Harker) who scorns him. He is extremely servile and walks around almost as a chimpanzee.

Gordon Harker Gordon Harker

A black man works as a bartender in the restaurant.

Young and Innocent

The killer (drummer man) performs in a band performing in blackface.

Shadow of a Doubt

When Charlie goes to Santa Rosa by train, the railroad porter is black.

Lifeboat

Canada Lee in Alfred Hitchcock's "Lifeboat"

Canada Lee (1907–1952) as Joe Spencer.

Strangers on a Train

The senator's servant is black.

Marnie

After Marnie steals from Rutland, and she is descending the stairs, a black man is seen on the left.

Topaz

Philippe Dubois (Roscoe Lee Browne) takes the identity of a black journalist from Ebony, sneaks into the Cuban embassy, manages to take photos of some of the important documents and then runs away, chased by Cuban revolutionaries.

Family Plot

One of the FBI agents questioning Arthur Adamson in his jewel store.

 

Alfred Hitchcock Cameos

Foreign Correspondent

After John Jones (Joel McCrea) leaves his hotel, Hitchcock is seen wearing a coat and hat and reading a newspaper.

The Birds

As Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren) enters the pet shop, Hitch is leaving with two white Sealyham terriers.

Family Plot

Hitchcock's silhouette is seen through the door of the Registrar of Births and Deaths.

Marnie

Hitchcock is entering from the left of the hotel corridor after Tippi Hedren passes by.

The Lodger

Hitchcock is sitting at a desk in the newsroom.

Torn Curtain

Hitchcock is sitting in the lobby of Hotel d'Angleterre, Copenhagen, with a baby on his knee. He shifts the child from one knee to the other.

Shadow of a Doubt

Hitchcock Cameo in Shadow of a Doubt

Shadow of a Doubt: Hitchock's cameo on the train taking uncle Charlie to Santa Rosa.

The Paradine Case

Hitchcock is leaving the train at Cumberland Station, carrying a cello case. Gregory Peck is carrying the suitcase.

Psycho

Hitchcock wearing a cowboy hat can be seen through the office window when Janet Leigh is entering.

Vertigo

Alfred Hitchcock is seen in a grey suit walking in the street outside Gavin Elsters company buildings.

Young and Innocent

Hitchcock is standing outside the courthouse, holding a camera.

Stage Fright

Hichcock is turning to look back at Jane Wyman in her disguise as Marlene Dietrich's maid.

The Wrong Man

Alfred Hitchcock introduces The Wrong Man in what is not a normal cameo appearence.

North by Northwest

Hitchcock too late for the bus at the end of the titles sequence.

Saboteur

Hitchcock is standing on the street outside a store, "Cut Rate Drugs".
Originally Hitchcock wanted to do a cameo with his secretary at the time, Carol Stevens, as deaf and dumb persons walking down the street. Then Hitchcock was to have made a presumably indecent proposal using sign language, resulting in the woman slapping him in the face.

 
   

 

 

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